Posts Categorized: Technology

Thoughts on Mitigating Data Caps

Posted by & filed under Analysis, Blog, Devices, DISH, Hybrid, Opinion, Technology, tvstrategies, Videonet.

vnetlogo2018Videonet has published the latest blog entry by David Price and myself

Our story so far: After beginning an experiment in cord-cutting, David received a rude awakening from his pay TV provider. This got us thinking about how to get around broadband data caps. Two approaches occurred to us right away.

The first is to make better use of available bandwidth by using improved codecs. The second is to postpone data cap charges with a hybrid broadcast solution. Both have their advantages and challenges…

Click for the rest of this story, on Videonet

Enjoy!

Best regards,
- Steve Hawley

The mobile service provider’s opportunity for quality and continuity in the Connected Car

Posted by & filed under Blog, Connected Car, Opinion, Technology, tvstrategies.

Every decade has seen generational advances in technology. The 1980s were the decade of enterprise communications and the local area network. The World Wide Web became a consumer phenomenon during the 1990s. In the 2000s, it was IPTV, which has led to today’s multiscreen delivery. Each of these saw a greater number of enabling technologies and stakeholders in the mix than the one before. Now it appears that we’re in the decade of the Connected Car, and if you’ll excuse the term, there is a convergence across more technologies and stakeholders this time than ever.

For communications service providers, the Connected Car breaks down into three broad areas of opportunity. The first is ‘connected infotainment,’ which is access to consumer-facing content and entertainment services using 3G or 4G broadband radio access. In addition to music in the front seat and video in the back seat for the kids, other features that fall within this category include location-oriented services, with content and traffic data used for mapping, route-finding, search and recommendation for points of interest, and to know weather conditions at a destination. Then there’s device presence, which can help drivers locate family members and help others see whether a person (or vehicle) is available over the network, or not. Some vehicles embed applications that enable the user to see a paired mobile phone’s directory and call logs on the in-dash display, and access dialing, messaging and email by voice command, turning the car into another device on the family’s mobile plan.

The second area is telematics, which represents the communications interface between the vehicle and services from outside world. These can be consumer-facing services and content as above, to report and track a stolen vehicle, or report conditions to the manufacturer or other business stakeholders. This can be vehicle-centric service content, for roadside assistance, concierge services, emergency calling, or the conveyance of vehicle status content for remote diagnostics. Enterprise applications include vehicle monitoring for fleet management, monitoring of vehicle speed to provide proof that the driver qualifies for safe driver insurance.   It can also be software updates, for consumer-facing apps or for the vehicle itself.

The third area is founded upon the relationships between a vehicle and its surroundings. Vehicle-to-Vehicle (V2V) and Vehicle-to-Infrastructure (V2I) communications will enable another broad range of applications. Although this is a much longer-range opportunity than the ones above, efforts are already underway by governments, regulators and technology suppliers to enable intelligent metropolitan transportation systems, to help coordinate traffic based on traffic density, traffic signals and environmental conditions; and even enable toll payment collection.

Another communication-related area is driver assistance, which, for now, is largely confined to the vehicle. Cameras, ultrasonic, or radar sensors mounted on or within the car become the sensory system of the car. Applications include the adaptation of speed to traffic, parking assistance, collision avoidance, lane departure warnings, blind-spot detection, and autonomous driving. Many car makers are in the process of developing and introducing assisted driving use-cases in production vehicles. Autonomous vehicles will need outside connectivity for telematics, V2V, and V2I applications.

Now let’s compare the convergence of TV with the Connected Car. While TVs and connected vehicles must both line up an ecosystem that consists of connectivity, content delivery, a consumer device, a user experience, applications, user management, and security, the Connected Car is a much more purpose-driven and situationally sensitive environment, with little room for error.

While the TV delivery ecosystem is complicated, TV is a relatively forgiving pastime. Sure, we can get annoyed when a TV channel macroblocks just as a home run ball sails over the fence; or just as the winning goal is made deep into stoppage time (and isn’t that what the instant replay is all about?). But the TV experience has no equivalent to avoiding a collision or having to dismiss an incoming phone call while in a stressful driving situation.   Those aren’t just annoying, they can be life-threatening.

The moral of this story is that the Connected Car is one of the next great opportunities for mobile communications providers. It’s both a target-rich and highly challenging environment. Quality of service, efficient software and effective integration will be key considerations. Continuity of experience will be of the utmost importance, as the vehicle moves from one location to another and then another, to ensure that content delivery is accurate and uninterrupted – especially when the data is mission critical.

Tizen: Is Samsung more powerful than Google?

Posted by & filed under Android, Intel, IPTV, Middleware, Samsung, Smartphones, Technology, Tizen.

tizen-logoThe Tizen software platform has been flying slightly below the radar for a couple of years now, but its time has come.  Tizen has a common core, plus four profiles: Tizen Mobile, Tizen TV, Tizen IVI (in-vehicle infotainment), and Tizen Wearable.  Tizen also has some very significant board members and partners.  Tizen’s lineage includes Samsung’s Linux platform and the LiMo (Linux Mobile) operating system.

Watchers of the mobile and connected TV device categories might remember MeeGo, an open-source operating system that was a merger of Nokia’s Maemo and Intel’s Moblin platforms.  MeeGo was used by IPTV set-top maker Amino Communications in its Intel Atom-based set-tops in 2010, though they later abandoned it.  In 2012 Intel changed its focus and joined Samsung in Tizen, which in effect, made Tizen MeeGo’s successor.

Samsung raised some eyebrows with Tizen at the 2014 Mobile World Congress in February, positioning it as a potential replacement for Android in Samsung smart phones and wearable devices.  At the 2014 Tizen Developer Conference, which happened to coincide with Apple’s WWDC in San Francisco last week, Samsung demonstrated that its own Tizen transformation was well underway.

Last week, Samsung also introduced the Samsung Z, its first Tizen-based smartphone; and Galaxy Gear 2, a Tizen-based wearable.  Tizen was even on TV: the Tizen Developer Conference had several Tizen TV sessions, and a cloud-based content repository for mobile users called Tizen Cloudbox, was being demonstrated on a Samsung smart TV.   And also last week, Multichannel News reported that the TV browser and middleware provider Espial was collaborating with Samsung on an RDK-based solution (although the article said nothing about Tizen).

Is Tizen good or bad for the TV technology space?  It depends on what the definition of “TV” is: a set-top box with a TV attached, versus a connected smart TV that has no set-top box.  Presumably,  Samsung’s existing smart TV app development platform, which supports HTML5, CSS3 and adaptive streaming standards, will be under Tizen.    On the pay TV side, now that Liberty Global has joined Comcast and Time Warner Cable in the RDK venture, a Tizen-based STB wouldn’t be outside the realm of possibility (assuming that the RDK were to be ported to Tizen).  Liberty Global’s Horizon set-top uses Samsung hardware.  But a Samsung Tizen STB is only a matter of speculation.

Another interesting direction for Tizen is in the Connected Car, where it could stand to challenge iOS, Android and Microsoft – just as it is doing in smartphones.  Tizen is available through the GENIVI alliance, which provides a Linux-based environment for automotive IVI (in-vehicle infotainment) systems.

All of this begs two questions.  First, is there room for “yet another” TV software platform?  I think, yes.  It certainly won’t hurt the TV software space: there are tens of middleware providers, and these days, large operators are tending more toward custom-built set-top software environments using components from multiple suppliers, rather than monolithic single-vendor stacks.

Just today (June 9), Accedo, which provides an application platform for pay TV, connected TVs and the Microsoft Xbox, announced that it was joining the Tizen Association program.  Clearly, Accedo sees a market opportunity – the question is whether it’s for Accedo in Samsung smart TVs, Samsung smartphones and tablets, or in pay TV set-top boxes (where Accedo has numerous customers).  Accedo positions itself as a provider of “…HTML based video and music streaming applications for connected devices.”  So perhaps it’s all of the above.  Actually, given what Accedo does, they must also recognize that they can ride Tizen’s coat tails into two new categories, wearables and cars.

The other, broader, question: “Is Tizen good for the industry overall?”  Again, I think yes.  It could have a huge and positive impact anywhere Android is sold.  Unlike Microsoft Windows Phone and Nokia, which have near negligible mobile device share today, Samsung is the largest provider of Android devices.  So an across-the-Samsung-board switch to Tizen will displace a significant percentage of Google’s Android base.   Assuming that Google cares, this potential for disruption could force Google to make Android better.  (I’m skeptical, since Google’s history is to abandon every iteration of its products and platforms as soon as a replacement becomes available. Ask Logitech about Google TV).

There’s one caveat: any effort by Samsung to force-replace Android with Tizen in devices already in the field may be met with some resistance.  While Apple’s fiercely loyal iDevice users squaked about the changes made by iOS 7, the underlying Apple ecosystem did not change.  By contrast, the act by Samsung to replace the entire Android ecosystem with one of its own is a much bigger move.  Ask yourself as an Android user: what would you do if you turned on your device one morning and found Tizen there?  Or as a Mac user, what if MacOS X suddenly disappeared and were replaced by Windows?

If successful, can it mean that Samsung is more powerful than Google?  Perhaps Tizen means that Samsung has finally decided that its product is not a product at all: it’s a relationship, and not just the next device.  Google has to decide the same thing: if Google only cares about ad sales, at the expense of a trustworthy experience with the Android brand, then it will be a matter of time before Google’s Android OEMs go looking for alternatives.  Samsung may be only the first to do so.  I’m encouraged: despite Tizen’s Samsung ties, device competitors Huawei and LG are on Tizen’s board while ZTE and Panasonic are members of the Tizen community.

New Report: TV Service Delivery Platforms 2014 (MRG)

Posted by & filed under Blog, Industry Research, IPTV, Middleware, MRG, Multiscreen, Reports, Technology, TV Service Delivery Platforms, tvstrategies.

MRG-2014-SDP-thumbA new report by Steven Hawley of tvstrategies, titled Multiplatform TV Middleware: TV Service Delivery Platforms, is now available from Multimedia Research Group (MRG, an SNL Kagan company).

The report provides a thorough examination and analysis of the TV Service Delivery Platform (TV SDP) category, and of the SDP offerings available to pay-TV operators from 17 different suppliers.  It provides a comprehensive resource for operators that are evaluating new TV service platforms, as well as for those seeking to understand the latest capabilities through which they can enhance their existing offerings or take them multiscreen.

Further information is available at the tvstrategies Web site, and from MRG.

 

Telecompetitor: The Half-life of Web TV Devices

Posted by & filed under Apps, Devices, DISH, Google TV, IPTV, Opinion, Technology, Telecompetitor.

We all replace our mobile phones and computers every few years, not to mention our cars and many other high-ticket items in our lives. But TVs are different. They’re supposed to last for ten or twenty years, aren’t they? But our first-generation Google TV device has reached its half-life. Read the entire article on Telecompetitor!